Willkommen bei WBTS-Forum.org !

Hallo !
Wir freuen uns immer über Besucher, aber leider gibt es im Internet zu viele Vandalen, als dass wir nicht registrierten Mitgliedern das Schreiben erlauben könnten.

Die Registrierung ist aber frei, alles was man braucht ist eine gültige Email-Adresse.

Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Fragen und Empfehlungen, was geht - und was nicht ...

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon Bene » Sa Feb 18, 2012 1:02 am

Gibt es regulations für das CSMC? Wenn die nach den uniform regulations der CS Army gehen (wobei die ja auch nicht wirklich durchgesetzt wurden), wäre der Stoff wohl das, was man "cadet gray broadcloth" nennt, schätze ich. Aber mit dem CSMC kenne ich mich nicht aus. Gibt es da überhaupt Stücke, die überlebt haben und an denen man sich richten könnte?
He lay face upward, taking in his breath in convulsive, rattling snorts, and blowing it out in sputters of froth which crawled creamily down his cheeks, dropping off in flakes and strings. I had not previously known one could get on, even in this unsatisfactory fashion, with so little brain.

Ambrose Bierce, ''What I Saw of Shiloh'' (1881/1898)
Benutzeravatar
Bene
Corporal
Corporal
 
Beiträge: 162
Registriert: Sa Jul 26, 2008 5:52 pm

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon CSMC » Sa Feb 18, 2012 9:58 am

Hi!
Bislang ein etwas "wunder" Punkt in der Darstellung, aber ....

... ja es gab welche, aber die wurden im Krieg oder bei einem Brand im Archiv des CSMC (in Capt. Bealls Haus) vernichtet. Bisher konnte kein Exemplar gefunden werden. Aber es gibt Bestellungs-/Empfangsformulare mit Beschreibungen und Berichte in Briefen, Zeitungen,...

.... ich bin mit unseren uniform regulations (CSMC, Co.A, Deutschland) fast fertig. Darin ist alles eingeflossen was es an Literatur, Quellen und Erfahrungen/Wissen von US CSMC reenactorn und Forschern gibt.
Unter anderem ist letztlich die komplette Uniform (vorher war in Osprey nur von einem kepi die Rede) von Pvt. Curtis durch David Sullivan ( Biographical sketches of CSMC officers, ...) untersucht worden. Die Erben erlauben zwar keine Photos aber er hat eine Zeichnung und Beschreibung angefertigt.
Es handelt um die 1864/65 regulations, gefertigt aus medium grey wool (siehe meine Bemerkungen oben zum Stoff). Es gibt noch 2 weitere Bilder von Pvts eines leider stark retuschiert. Sieht nach gleichmäßigem Wollstoff aus und wird auch so beschrieben. Von den Offizieren sind ca 12 Bilder vorhanden und einige Briefe (Wolle + satinette) und eine Uniform (bluishgrey wool).

a) damit ist inzwischen der Stoff (Pvt.) auch noch für 1864 klar
b) eine Pvt Uniform ist im Original dokumentiert.
c) 18(63)64-65 befanden sich fast alle CS Marines in Richmond, Camp Beall. --> Richmond Depot, Import GB

Aber das gehört eigentlich woanders hin ;-) Ich poste unsere regulations bei Fertigstellung!

Sam

PS: Über die Knopflöcher hat er leider nichts geschrieben :nein:
Hilf dir selbst, dann hilft dir Gott!
Bild
www.csmarines.de / www.csmarines.org
Benutzeravatar
CSMC
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
 
Beiträge: 1927
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Fr Nov 02, 2007 1:03 pm
Wohnort: bei Freiburg im Breisgau/Baden

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon CSMC » Di Feb 21, 2012 5:21 pm

Auf der Fb "buttobhole Seite" kam grad dieser link an:

http://www.history.army.mil/html/museums/uniforms/survey_uwa.pdf

Was Ihr schon immer über USA Uniformen/Ausrüstung wissen wolltet!

Sam
Hilf dir selbst, dann hilft dir Gott!
Bild
www.csmarines.de / www.csmarines.org
Benutzeravatar
CSMC
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
 
Beiträge: 1927
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Fr Nov 02, 2007 1:03 pm
Wohnort: bei Freiburg im Breisgau/Baden

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon Hans-J. » Di Feb 21, 2012 9:39 pm

Danke für diesen sehr informativen Link.

Gruß
Hans-Jörg
Benutzeravatar
Hans-J.
Corporal
Corporal
 
Beiträge: 128
Registriert: Mi Nov 02, 2011 9:38 am
Wohnort: Greven (Westf.)

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon CSMC » Mo Feb 27, 2012 8:09 am

Intressanter Post auf FB:

CS als kit handgenäht zu Hause in Richmond:

Mike Mears
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE RICHMOND DEPOT CLOTHING MANUFACTORY

During the first year of the war, the various volunteer regiments were operating under the commutation system. It became obvious to the Confederate government that this system would not provide a large army with all the items it required over an extended period of time.

On 6th September 1861 a Clothing Bureau was established in Richmond, Virginia. It was similar in size to others, established at about the same time throughout the Confederacy. Major Richard Waller was in overall command of the bureau.

The bureau had two separate branches. The first, a shoe manufactory under the command of Captain Stephen Putney and a clothing manufactory under O F Weisiger. Weisiger, a former dry goods merchant, ran the manufactory as a civilian until 1863 when he was commissioned a Quartermaster Captain.

Raw materials were supplied to the clothing manufactory through a central quartermaster department "Depot" in Richmond. The materials were obtained from a number of textile firms.

• The Crenshaw Woolen Mills of Richmond. Wool jeans & cotton jeans, it
also supplied imported clothing such as shirts & drawers. From early 1862
till the summer of 1863.
• The Danville Manufacturing company of Danville Virginia. Wool kersey,
wool-cotton cashmere & wool-cotton jeans cloth. From early 1862 till late
1864.
• The Manchester Cotton & Wool Manufacturing Co. of Richmond &
Manchester Virginia. Woolen jeans cloth, cashmere and woolen broad
cloth.
• The Scottsville manufacturing Co. of Scottsville Virginia. Wool-cotton
jeans, wool-cotton cashmere and cotton osnaburg for shirting drawers
and lining.

In addition to the larger firms listed above, small to medium size lots of cloth were received from other small mills in Virginia and North Carolina. After the winter of 1863, the Richmond Depot also received large quantities of English made blue-grey kersey, so by the summer of 1864 the clothing manufactory had become largely dependent on this imported cloth for its manufacture of uniforms.

The clothing manufactory had a staff of about 24 professional tailors, using patterns probably made of tin who would cut out all the various parts and pieces for each garment. The parts were then bundled together along with thread and buttons, these could be described as "kits", these "kits" were issued out to women who assembled the garments in their homes. The women were personally responsible for traveling to and from the depot to pick up "kits" and return the finished garments.
From early 1863, large amounts of clothing were made and issued to the soldiers in the field. Some statistics can be revealed from contemporary records from the last six months of 1864 up to and including January 31st 1865.

• 104,199 jackets
• 140,570 pairs of trousers
• 167,862 pairs of shoes
• 157,727 cotton shirts
• 170,139 pairs of drawers
• 146,136 pairs of socks

These were field issues only, and did not include items issued to the men at posts, paroled and exchanged prisoners or those in hospitals. Field returns for this time period show a maximum strength of 85,000 men including officers in the army of Northern Virginia.

While large quantities of clothing were available, there were other problems the main one being transportation, so while warehouses in Richmond, Lynchburg and other locations had uniforms and equipment in stock, the troops in the field did not always get what they needed in a timely manner and could be left wanting. Even when large amounts of clothing were issued in the field, the soldiers tended to wear them out very quickly. This was especially true during an active campaign.

Emphasis on the "ragged rebel", while certainly truthful at times has come to personify the Confederate soldier for the whole of the war. For southern apologists, it was the perfect image the more ragged and lacking he was in basic equipment, the more glorious his victories and the easier to accept his defeat. But other factors, such as unequal heavy industry, railroads, armament production, and naval power were far more powerful in their effect on the war effort than the clothing on the soldiers back. The "ragged rebel" has stood as a convenient symbol that has obscured much of what the Confederacy accomplished, in its production and supply of clothing and equipment, and has even diverted attention from other things that went wrong.

Jon Egglestone, 18th Virginia

Bibliography & other research sources: -
• Leslie D Jensen, a survey of Confederate Central Government
Quartermaster Issue Jackets, part 1. 1989
• Chris White, Proprietor of The New Richmond Depot.
• Editors of time-Life books, Echoes of Glory - Arms & Equipment of the
Confederacy. 1991.


Sam
Hilf dir selbst, dann hilft dir Gott!
Bild
www.csmarines.de / www.csmarines.org
Benutzeravatar
CSMC
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
 
Beiträge: 1927
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Fr Nov 02, 2007 1:03 pm
Wohnort: bei Freiburg im Breisgau/Baden

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon CSMC » Fr Aug 17, 2012 9:49 am

Hat einer der US reenator in fb gepostet:

Great Number of Sewing Machines.
According ti a statistical article in the Scinetific American, the number of sewing machines annually manufactured in this country is 70,000.Twelve or fourteen establishments are negaged in the business. The number of machines made in 1853 was only 2500. Up to the present time (from 1852 t0 1862) the aggregate is 200,000; and 358 American patents for improvements on the original design have been takne out within thirteen years.
(Daily Missouri Republican; 19 August 1862)


200.000 Maschinen ist schon was, oder?

Sam
Hilf dir selbst, dann hilft dir Gott!
Bild
www.csmarines.de / www.csmarines.org
Benutzeravatar
CSMC
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
 
Beiträge: 1927
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Fr Nov 02, 2007 1:03 pm
Wohnort: bei Freiburg im Breisgau/Baden

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon charles kaiser » Mo Aug 20, 2012 7:05 pm

Was denn für Maschinen ? Nur für Stoff, oder auch für Leder ? Gingen die auch in den Export ?
Fragen über Fragen !!!!
Chas. Kaiser, Privat, Co. D 17th Missouri Volunteer Infantry (Re)
German Mess

Ceterum censeo 'Confoederationem esse delendam

Auf, für Lincoln und die Freiheit!

In Memory of Anthony and Joseph Schaer,
Borlands Regiment/ 62nd Ark. Militia/Adams Inf./Cokes Inf.


Wer anderen die Freiheit verweigert, verdient sie nicht für sich selbst.(Abraham Lincoln)
Bild
Benutzeravatar
charles kaiser
First Sergeant
First Sergeant
 
Beiträge: 528
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Di Apr 17, 2007 9:48 am
Wohnort: Remblinghausen, Sauerland

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon CSMC » Di Aug 21, 2012 8:44 pm

CSMC hat geschrieben:Hat einer der US reenator in fb gepostet:

Great Number of Sewing Machines.
According ti a statistical article in the Scinetific American, the number of sewing machines annually manufactured in this country is 70,000.Twelve or fourteen establishments are negaged in the business. The number of machines made in 1853 was only 2500. Up to the present time (from 1852 t0 1862) the aggregate is 200,000; and 358 American patents for improvements on the original design have been takne out within thirteen years.
(Daily Missouri Republican; 19 August 1862)


200.000 Maschinen ist schon was, oder?

Sam


Nähmaschinen für Stoffe, so wie es der Titel dieses treads sagt.
Hilf dir selbst, dann hilft dir Gott!
Bild
www.csmarines.de / www.csmarines.org
Benutzeravatar
CSMC
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
 
Beiträge: 1927
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Fr Nov 02, 2007 1:03 pm
Wohnort: bei Freiburg im Breisgau/Baden

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon charles kaiser » Mi Aug 22, 2012 6:54 pm

Woran erkennst Du das ? Sewing Machine heißt nur Nähmaschine, mehr nicht.
Chas. Kaiser, Privat, Co. D 17th Missouri Volunteer Infantry (Re)
German Mess

Ceterum censeo 'Confoederationem esse delendam

Auf, für Lincoln und die Freiheit!

In Memory of Anthony and Joseph Schaer,
Borlands Regiment/ 62nd Ark. Militia/Adams Inf./Cokes Inf.


Wer anderen die Freiheit verweigert, verdient sie nicht für sich selbst.(Abraham Lincoln)
Bild
Benutzeravatar
charles kaiser
First Sergeant
First Sergeant
 
Beiträge: 528
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Di Apr 17, 2007 9:48 am
Wohnort: Remblinghausen, Sauerland

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon J.H.Berger » Fr Aug 24, 2012 6:49 pm

Ledernähmaschinen für Leder gab es auch schon aber die sind nicht in dem Maße eingesetzt worden. Das St Louis Depot hat z.B. in einem Rundschreiben festgelegt , daß die #"implement puches" and Patronentaschen mit der Maschine genäht sein durften. aber nur die. Adler in Bielefeld hat wenn ich mich recht entsinne 1860 mit Ledernähmaschinene begonnen.
J.H.Berger
Hornist
German Mess
Benutzeravatar
J.H.Berger
Private
Private
 
Beiträge: 92
Registriert: Mi Mai 17, 2006 3:42 pm

Re: Hand ,- vs. Maschinengenäht

Beitragvon CSMC » Sa Sep 13, 2014 3:15 pm

Hilf dir selbst, dann hilft dir Gott!
Bild
www.csmarines.de / www.csmarines.org
Benutzeravatar
CSMC
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant
 
Beiträge: 1927
Bilder: 0
Registriert: Fr Nov 02, 2007 1:03 pm
Wohnort: bei Freiburg im Breisgau/Baden

Vorherige

Zurück zu How to ... ?



cron